During a hearing on an Idaho bill championed by anti-abortion groups, Republican state Rep. Pete Nielsen said he believed that rape and incest were unlikely to lead to pregnancy.

“Now, I’m of the understanding that in many cases of rape it does not involve any pregnancy because of the trauma of the incident. That may be true with incest a little bit,” Nielsen said, according to Idaho’s Spokesman-Review.

The bill before the Idaho House would require women seeking abortions to be told they have a right to free ultrasounds, and to hear a fetal heart monitor. The Spokesman-Review also reported that backers of the bill believe it will lead to fewer women having abortions, and that the bill does not include an exception for women who became pregnant as a result of rape or incest. Neilson reportedly elaborated on his comments after the hearing:

“I read a lot of information. I have read it several times. … Being a father of five girls, I’ve explored this a lot.”

Of course, that’s just not the case. A National Institutes of Health study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology found in 1996 that “rape-related pregnancy occurs with significant frequency,” which the study found was about 5 percent.

Nielsen is just the latest male politician pushing fact-free opinions about abortion, in an attempt to restrict women’s access and reproductive rights.

Who can forget former U.S. Congressman Todd Aikin’s feeling that “if it’s legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut the whole thing down,” or Indiana Republican U.S. Senate candidate Richard Mourdock’s statement that “even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen,” which helped lead to his defeat in 2012.

And sadly, it’s still happening. Ahead of the Texas anti-abortion bill heading to the Supreme Court, “Full Frontal” host Samantha Bee sat down with Texas Rep. Dan Flynn, who told Bee he didn’t believe that women denied access to abortions will try to self-induce.

Just another reminder that women can’t trust Republican politicians with their healthcare.